5 of my favourite books.

Apr 21, 2017


For me, curling up on the couch with a book and hot cup of tea in the evening, is basically, like, wellness for the mind and soul. So with World book day just around the corner (23 April) I couldn't not dedicate this week's blogpost to reading. Today I'm sharing with you 5 books that I not only loved to read, but that also partly shaped the way I go about my life. Now don't go expecting a list of high-end literary works or difficult philosophical essays. I'm not saying that a little bit of intellectual challenge here and there is a bad thing but, for me, reading mainly means relaxing. So, have a look at my list and by all means, leave your favourite reads in the comments below!

The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley

I actually owe my name to this book. My mother read it during her pregnancy and fell in love with the name of the character Nimue. I personally have this love-hate relationship with my name. I like that it's a name that you don't hear often and I like it's origin (Celtic myths and saga's), but I hate that almost no one can pronunce it properly. It always makes me extra uncomfortable when meeting new people. Ayhow, I only got around to reading the about two years ago (shame on me) and I have to say I really enjoyed it. I loved the feminist messages, which are nicely intertwined with some good old catholic church bashing. Lord, how different the world would look if we would've kept our pagan religions!

Confessions of Georgia Nicholson by Louise Rennison

This series of 10 books are literally what got me through puberty and adolecense. A horrid period in a person's life (or at least in my experience), made bearable by Georgia Nicholson's hilarious confessions. She allowed me to laugh at her misery for moment, instead of wallowing in my own. She also made me feel less alone in some issues I struggled with (like thinking that I was ugly or the only one with "weird" parents). I just think every teenage girl should read these and also that Rennison's (may she rest in peace) sense of humour is simply brillo-pads.

Pride & Predjudice by Jane Austen

Such a classic. And of course I saw the 1995 BBC series before I read the book. About 5 times probably. And then is read the book 2 times. And then I watched the series some more. I just can't get enough of the brilliant dialogue, the vivid characters and of course the romance. I have to say that I think Jane Austen is partly to blame for my high expectations in men. In fact it's quite wonderful that I even managed to find a man who lives up to (most of) them. Oh, and on a side note, I think most of the women who read this book identify themselves with Lizzy, but I'm actually more of a Mr. Darcy. People also often think I'm arrogant, when actually I'm just really bad at small talk. And I can sometimes judge others quite harshly indeed, but I also have a strong sense of responsibility, certainly for the people I love.


Eat, pray, love by Elisabeth Gilbert

This book really helped me tapping into my own spirituality. This book is all about finding balance and also about accepting that losing balance from time to time is part of a balanced life. Important lessons to learn, and Gilbert writes them down with and honesty that makes it feel like you're having one of those deep conversations about life with your best friend instead of reading a book.

The Carrie Diaries by Candace Bushnell 

I wanted to put Sex and The City here first, but that would be kind of lying, because in this case, I really enjoyed the series more than the book on which it was loosely based. I did however very much like the prequel Bushnell wrote. I also feel like this was more a prequel for the series than for the book by the way. I read this one while I was studying Journalism and it really helped me in believing in myself and in my dreams at that time. Somewhere along the way I've managed to loose that faith in myself, and also the certainty about what my dreams really are. But then again, life is an on-going journey, so I'm sure it'll all come (back) to me one day.